Thursday, May 02, 2013

Spring: Thursday Inspiration



Spring is delicate green filling in the landscape, one leaf at a time. Once the temperatures begin to rise, there's no stopping spring from bursting out in color.
 

This is what the roses look like at Butchart Gardens just now. In March the plants were pruned to about knee height. In April, after danger of frost (although we have had frosty nights lately) the gardeners cut them back severely. I spoke with one of the gardeners last week who told me that intensive feeding now will result in the beautiful blooms we will see in June. I can hardly believe that these stubs will produce anything. I'll be sure to go to the gardens in June just to see this.

 

Fritillary. One variation is called Chocolate Lily. I didn't know these flowers existed in North America. Actually, until a conversation with Elizabeth of Cornish Cream a couple of months ago, I didn't know they existed at all. They are apparently native to Western North America. Have you seen these before? Do you have any in your garden?

Linking with Mary of the Little Red House for Inspiration Thursday.

25 comments:

Debra @ Homespun said...

Never heard of that stunning flower but I was in awe at the first photo! That looks like a painting. Gorgeous!

A Garden of Threads said...

I used to have them in my garden, but they are not native to this part of Canada. The lily beetle ate all of them:( Isn't it so nice spring has arrived?

Lavender Cottage said...

Hi Lorrie
The snake's head fritillary you're showing is the one I posted about putting citrus around in the garden to hopefully thwart the red lily beetle.
Love that first photo.
Judith

Art and Sand said...

I love the Snake's Head Fritillary - just beautiful.

Vee said...

That is a uniquely beautiful plant and new to me. I was pruning my rose bushes this morning and am now concerned that I should prune them as I see these...that's because I could see brown in the center of the cane.

Pamela Gordon said...

That is a beautiful photo of the weeping willow Lorrie. And it is really hard to believe the roses will come up from those dry looking sticks in the soil. I'll certainly look forward to seeing your photos when they are in bloom. I have heard of fritillary but haven't seen one for real. They are a beautiful bloom aren't they? I hope you have a nice weekend. Hugs, Pam

podso said...

I've never seen these but they are so interesting! Love the weeping willow tree!

ellen b. said...

Yes, we spotted one fritillary in the Santa Monica Mountains and we saw several in Oxford, England. So interesting...

Judy ~ My Front Porch said...

Oh dear...my roses are all leafed out! I likely should have pruned them back this spring. Willow trees in spring are so beautiful. Chocolate lily...love the name!

Jen @ Muddy Boot Dreams said...

The fritilaria are a native up here....not many left but when you find one, they are gorgeous.

Jen

JoAnn ( Scene Through My Eyes) said...

Oh lovely spring. No, I don't have those flowers - but I've seen them before - quite interesting.

Roses, Lace and Brocante said...

Hi Lorrie
Oh I would just adore to live in your climate and grow fritillaria!
Our winters in Auckland just aren't cold enough!
My mouth is watering at the sight of these beauties - the colour is wonderful.
Peonies are something else we can't grow here - they are grown in the south of NZ and I can buy the flowers but they're very expensive!
Interesting tip from the Butchart gardener for the rose bushes - I'm writing that in my garden notebook to start feeding heavily in mid September for good growth and blooms come November - we'll see what happens!
Shane ♥

Pat @ Mille Fiori Favoriti said...

I am really starved for Spring flowers! Your photos are lovely. Lorrie. We had 8 inches of snow yesterday so it seems Spring is skipping by us completely!

Elizabethd said...

Beautiful Fritillaries Lorrie!
Hope you got my message to say mine have arrived safely.

cucki said...

beautiful..
have a happy weekend x

My Little Home and Garden said...

That's a stunning photo of the fritillary. As for the first picture, I imagine any woodland nymph would be more than happy to dance through such a setting. Gorgeous!

~✽Mumsy✽~ said...

Your spring photos are beautiful, and very magical to see!

Pondside said...

That willow is gorgeous.
Our roses are looking pretty sad right now - not as tidy as the plants at Butchart Gardens. Mine look look like they've had very bad haircuts!

shirley said...

Lovely landscape in your first photo - so pretty and fresh.
As for the fritillary - I've seen them in plant catalogs, but not in real life. They look very interesting!
Have a great Friday and weekend!

Friko said...

I love fritillaries. They are at their best when allowed to colonise a grassy spring garden, with lots of other bulbs.

Pat Cantwell said...

Lorrie,
Blossom~by~Blossom, Spring arrives!
I have never seen a Fritillary before today.
Thank you for sharing this unique floral, dear one!
Fondly,
Pat

materfamilias said...

There are chocolate liles growing wild a few hundred feet from our home -- they're such a gift!

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Donna said...

I've seen that shape of a flower before, but not that checkerboard purple color! Very pretty!

Barbara said...

That top picture is amazing Lorrie.