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Tuesday, July 14, 2015

A Seaside Walk



A friend and I walked along the water this afternoon. Our temperatures have cooled down to the very pleasant mid-twenties (Celsius). Queen Anne's Lace is in bloom everywhere along the roadsides and beaches. 
 

A unique decorative windmill, charming to watch spinning round and round in the breeze. 
 

This single white feather, caught in a flower bed, probably drifted down from one of the many gulls curving over the area. 
 

More Queen Anne's Lace, some going to seed already. I've heard this plant called Cow Parsley, but often wonder if it's the same thing. Whatever the name, it's so graceful and pretty.

 

31 comments:

  1. Last year we grew Queen Anne's Lace in the kitchen garden (wildflower seed mix). The small red flower in the center is characteristic and it helped me to know the name of this flower.

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  2. Here it is often called Lady's lace. But the larger heavier variety is known by the rather ugly name of 'Hogweed;.

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  3. What a lovely walk you took us on, and that garden windmill, it does look like one I photographed in my neighbor's garden the other day. I also stopped by your post with the beautiful mosaic and butterflies, and how wonderful that is. Have a great day~

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  4. Oh that walk nearly cooled me down! Nearly! And I love Queen Anne's Lace - a favorite since childhood...

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  5. Your weather sounds beautiful. And so nice to live near water to take a walk like this. Beautiful photos of queen anne's lace, one of my favorites.

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  6. It's calming to walk alone the water's shore isn't it? There are several plants that produce a flower like Queen Anne's lace, the leaves are the best way for ID.

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  7. A seaside walk accompanied by cooler temperatures? Sounds perfectly lovely. Thanks for taking us along.

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  8. You had such a refreshing walk!! I really enjoyed walking with you. That white feather is so lovely. It is very hot hot and humid here. It is like being in sauna.

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  9. I feel relaxed just following you along the beach. Dad called this plant wild parsley and poisonous to livestocl, one of those lovely plants that bears caution. Love your feather photo.

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  10. Beautiful photos. I love the whirligig. It's difficult the tell the difference between cow parsley and Queen Anne's lace when looking at the blossom but the leaves are different. I still don't know which is which but it's pretty. LOL Is it still hot and dry there? We're getting a few showers today but not enough to quench the earth yet.

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  11. What a beautiful walk, dear Lorrie. Thank you for sharing your sweet and charming pictures with us. Hugs and blessings!

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  12. Oh I can almost tell from the photos that the weather has taken a good turn. Everything looks so crisp and clear. Makes me wish for a handy beach at the seacoast to walk along. I am in need of an ocean day soon.

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  13. What beautiful blue water and blue skies! I do love Queen Anne's Lace. Isn't it in the carrot family?

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  14. Qween Anne's Lace is a favorite of mine. Its so lovely with the blue water background. Thank you for your comforting words left on my blog. I will be walking the seashore near me this weekend for a much needed calm respite.

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  15. Lovely post, the Queen Anns Lace against the blue sky is a beautiful photo. I agree with the other comments but don't know which , you could look it up in a wild flower book or as most of do these days search on google then write it down, I find I remember things better if I write it down on paper.

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  16. Beautiful photos Lorrie. Glad your weather has straightened itself out. A beach walk sounds wonderful.

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  17. Lovely photos!! I did not know that Queen Anne's lace grew at the seaside! We often see it growing wild along the roadsides. Wherever it is, it is delicate and beautiful.

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  18. I love the Queen Anne's lace which is blooming here as well. I also love the sculptural beauty as it curls up into that great seed-head, and I always try to collect some for fall-winter bouquets.

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  19. Such pretty pix dear Lorrie - I too love Queen Anne's Lace, and yes, in England they call it cow parsley.
    I was able to walk through a water meadow there where it was rampant - it was quite ethereal and I felt like a (big) fairy princess! I love cutting some from the roadside here but usually keep it in a vase on the porch, or deck, as it does get messy and drop in the house - plus often it's 'buggy'!

    Still unbearably hot here - close to 100F most days - I'm just not a Summer person by any means!
    Not sure with whom you walked but If you see H please tell her I miss her, hope all is well and that she'll thrill us with a post soon, thanks dear. Meanwhile, many thanks for all your lovely comments whilst I've been traveling - I've kept up with you but not had time to comment much.

    Mary X

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  20. Beautiful photos - I love walks by the ocean. I am happy that our temperatures have mellowed out a bit - so much more pleasant.

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  21. It has definitely cooled down to beautiful PNW summer here as well! We come to Oregon in the summer to cool down from Spring in Florida ;)). Beautiful water walk and I like Queen Anne's lace always have.

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  22. Count me in as a fellow lover of Queen Anne's lace too! This weekend I noticed lots of it among the roadsides. Very neat windmill!
    Blessings, Aimee

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  23. I can sense the sea air through your pictures - it must have been so refreshing after the poor air quality from fires.
    I love all those 'lacy' plants, too. In the UK the one we call cow parsley is an early bloomer, frothing the lanes and hedgerows in May and early June. Later on there,s a succession of similar but tougher plants
    Ending up with Giant hogweed, taller than me and with purple blotches on its stem.


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  24. I can sense the sea air through your pictures - it must have been so refreshing after the poor air quality from fires.
    I love all those 'lacy' plants, too. In the UK the one we call cow parsley is an early bloomer, frothing the lanes and hedgerows in May and early June. Later on there,s a succession of similar but tougher plants
    Ending up with Giant hogweed, taller than me and with purple blotches on its stem.


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  25. Such gorgeous pictures! You have captured the essence of the serenity and the quiet energy of the wind and the waves. I too love the lacy elegance of Queen Anne's Lace. When I was married, it was in a remote area, where there was only one florist to choose from. She refused to get QAL for my bridal bouquet, because it was a "roadside weed". My shy mother rose to the challenge, and gathered some herself, brought it to the florist, and insisted it be incorporated into my bouquet! So I tend to think of it as Heroic Mother's Lace....and I always smile when I think of the courage it took her.

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  26. I've always liked Queen Anne's lace. One year I decided to plant some in my garden and as I went about trying to find seeds, I usually met with "That's just a weed. What do you want to plant that for?" Silly people!

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  27. Beautiful pictures, Lorrie. I always love a seaside walk, and seeing the flowers that grow nearby. I love the Queen Anne's Lace.
    Helen xox

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  28. Queen Anne's Lace is so pretty in the wild, but wish it held up better in bouquets. Your photos are lovely and how I wish I was walking right there.

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  29. There are always treasures to be found on a seaside walk.
    Our queen Anne is just blooming here, Lorrie.

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  30. What a beautiful place to go for a walk and relax. Thank you for taking us along! xx

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  31. Pretty photos Lorrie and I like all that wild Queen Annes lace here too!

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