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Sunday, August 07, 2016

Roses and Handwork



Everywhere we went on our trip - Paris, Normandy, the Cotswolds, Wales - we noticed the roses. They trailed on stone walls, scrambled up brick houses, and framed wooden shutters, showing off their colored ruffles. 

The rose garden in the center of the mosaic above is the Queen's Garden at Sudeley Castle, named for the four queens of England who once walked there: Queen Katherine Parr, Queen Anne Boleyn, Lady Jane Grey, and Queen Elizabeth I. It's a beautiful place, with over 70 varieties of roses delicately scenting the air. 


The castle has a very interesting display of textiles - including this finely worked canopy said to have been stitched by Anne Boleyn and her ladies-in-waiting for the christening of Anne's daughter, Elizabeth, later Queen Elizabeth I. 


The notice under this piece of fine handwork said that Anne's symbol, the falcon, and her initials are found in the pattern. I stood there for a long, long time and discovered several falcons, but no initials. So I consulted the very friendly and informative guide who told me that she'd never found them either, but the piece had been sent to the Victoria and Albert Museum for analysis and verification, and they did find initials. Can you see the falcon in the detail above? The work is so very fine. 

Another piece that interested me very much was a christening gown, said to have been worn by Elizabeth I. It was hard to photograph these pieces behind glass. The canopy has been verified by the V & A, but the gown doesn't have the same provenance, although it's very likely Elizabeth's gown. When a textile has remained in the same family for a long time, along with the stories, there is more likelihood of the story being true. 


The floral bed hangings and coverlet in this photo were created for Marie Antoinette of France by Aubusson, and were purchased for Sudeley Castle in 1842. 

I've always been fascinated by the historical and literary connections between France and England - they are so intricately woven together, as is much of Europe. 


The manicured grounds of Sudeley Castle are set off from the pastureland and fields by this aged stone fence. 

While we were on our trip, Deanna from Creekside Cottage emailed to tell me that the latest Victoria magazine featured the Cotswolds, Sudeley Castle, and Wales. I thought I had missed the issue, but it is the August publication and I purchased one this week. How fun to recognize the photos.


One last rose - this one from the graveyard in Auvers-sur-Oise where Vincent Van Gogh is buried. 

Linking to Mosaic Monday, hosted by Maggie of Normandy Life. 

38 comments:

  1. Stunning roses, Lorrie, your mosaic is beautiful. We've not visited Sudeley yet but after seeing your photographs it's now on the list.
    Wishing you a wonderful week ahead.

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  2. Truly gorgeous roses and handwork!
    Happy Mosaic Monday!

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  3. Stunning mosaic. I found the falcon on the lacework but no initials. How wonderful to have a christening gown for so long. Our family gown was used for my daughters and now the Grandchildren which makes it so special.

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  4. If the initials were meant to be hidden in the handwork, Anne Boleyn and her ladies were successful, eh? Beautiful hand work.
    And a wonderful collection/collage of roses.

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  5. such beautiful roses..and the olden stone fence...

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  6. Your rose collage is fabulous Lorrie! Love the old fence too. Have a happy week.

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  7. Your rose mosaic is beautiful, as well as your banner. I love the colors. Perhaps you noticed as well in England (since I've not been to France), that much of the plant material that we grow here is the same, except I noticed that delicate shade plants that are often potted patio plants here in Colorado (Zone 5), are grown in garden beds, especially fuchsia, in England. The antique textiles are so amazing, first that they have survived for so long. Loved seeing and reading about them.

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  8. Hello, Lorrie! Your roses mosaic is simply beautiful. The view with the stone fence is beautiful. Wonderful images from your trip! Happy Monday, enjoy your new week!

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  9. Beautiful roses and the textiles are amazing. Happy Monday! Have a great week.

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  10. The draperies around the bed are gorgeous! It makes you want to find some old fashioned tapestry with roses! Love your beautiful roses too! Happy Mosaic Monday!

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  11. Lovely roses and such interesting pieces found in the castle! I love the history and the stories from long ago.

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  12. If I ever make it to England, I now have Sudeley Castle on my list of must sees! Thank you so much for sharing your beautiful photos and the stories!

    It was so fun to see the very things from your trip in Victoria magazine!

    I'm planting more roses in my gardens, I've been inspired!

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  13. Gorgeous roses there in the Queens' Garden! And more beautiful things in the castle! So rich with history!

    (I think I'd have stared my eyes out looking for those initials.) :)

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  14. Pure bliss...I'm not sure which I loved seeing more...the roses, gardens or that heirloom needlework!! All favorites of mine!
    Thanks for sharing your lovely photos & for all the explanations along with them. I continue to learn from you, Lorrie!

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  15. Your rose photos are wonderful! The Queen's Garden must have been incredibly beautiful.
    It sounds like you had a wonderful holiday and are back in time to enjoy some of our summer sunshine.

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  16. vraiment magnifique
    pour la première broderie , je pourrais distinguer un A au centre en bas
    merci de nous faire voyager avec des fleurs
    bonne fin de journée
    edith (iris) France

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  17. Lorrie, Thanks for photos of your trip. Many bloggers headed to England this summer. I believe I see the falcon and the A for Anne but I did not locate the B. I love the wall covered with mosses. Sylvia D.

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  18. Gorgeous roses. I always did grow better roses in England than here in Canada.

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  19. Gorgeous roses and royal handiwork done by talented ladies. On the bottom under the raven I can see what looks like an 'a' and there appears to be an '8' that could be a b? Of course I may have been looking too hard and I'm seeing what I want to see?lol

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  20. Wow...such detail and beauty...I can't even imagine how tedious that must have been! And that bed...I just want to crawl in and sleep forever!

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  21. Your photos are so lovely, Lorrie! I love visiting historical places. I also love roses for many reasons. They are my birth month flower and my Mother and Grandmother always grew roses. I had not luck growing them in Brooklyn, though try as I might. They always seemed to get diseased and dry. I planted knock out rose here in Colorado and they are doing well, but I had to surround them with chicken wire to keep te deer away. It is a good thing I did as a fawn was trying very hard to eat them a week ago! It kept trying and trying and we had a good laugh over it.

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  22. Your pictures should be in that magazine! Gorgeous.

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  23. That handwork is so amazing. Your rose mosaic is lovely. Sudely Castle was a great stop!

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  24. So lovely floral bed hangings and coverlet! As well, a stunning mosaic of delicate roses! Lots of beauty shared! Many thanks!
    Have a great week ahead!

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  25. So lovely, roses and textiles and castles. Yes, I saw the Victoria Magazine and immediately thought of you.

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  26. I don't think we can ever have enough of roses - in gardens or on textiles. I saw that Victoria magazine as well - lovely images. The canopy made by Ann and her ladies is really a treasure, and I did see the falcon.

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  27. The beauty of roses transcends cultural boundaries!

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  28. Such a beautiful mosaic of roses. Sudeley is wonderful isn't it? How poignat the rose is from Vincent van Gogh's burial place. I recently watched a fascinating documentary about an English lady who lived in France discovering the truth about the loss of his ear:)

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  29. Hi Lorrie. Summer sure is going by fast and I've just caught up on all your post from your trip abroad. It all looks so beautiful and fun and interesting. Enjoy the rest of this summer month. Pam

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  30. The roses are stunning!

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  31. The roses are stunning! What an interesting post. My husband and I travel a lot and I will have to add Sudeley Castle to our next visit. Your photos are wonderful and so was your trip itinerary. Thanks for sharing your tip, I enjoyed the tour…...

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  32. Lorrie, what gorgeous sights to see! Love all the textiles especially the first lacey one. And the flowers - sigh - lovely!

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  33. To imagine that these fragile textiles have been preserved all this time. Such fine work.

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  34. Beautiful handwork and roses!

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  35. Oh I was SO fascinated by this post Lorrie! Thank you so very much for taking time to photograph the textiles and share the history with us. Have a wonderful week!

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  36. I love and the roses and I love the brilliant throws, these castles always make the past seem so appealing. Until you visit the kitchen :-)
    Amalia
    xo

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  37. I was intrigued by the handwork done with hidden symbols. I found the falcon and I see
    some intials that look like a Q and an A on the bottom half. I did not find an S for Stuart.

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  38. Oh yes, the roses! They were everywhere and what a treat it all was too! I so enjoyed seeing the handwork and the lace. Such craftsmanship and a sense of the beautiful.

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