Friday, January 20, 2023

A Garden in Winter

 


You might think I've lost the plot with the contrast between the post title and the first photo. Orchids do not bloom here in January, in spite of having the mildest climate in Canada. But they do flourish indoors at Butchart Gardens, where I took myself for a treat one recent afternoon. 


In the weeks after Christmas, one of the restaurant spaces at the Gardens is converted into a "Spring Prelude", complete with emerging bulbs - daffodils, hyacinths, and tulips galore, along with more exotic blooms and even a koi pond. Walking into the space I was greeted with a warm humid blast of scented air that even I perceived, with my diminished sense of smell. 


..."gardening begins in January with the dream."
Josephine Nuese

I thought this idea very attractive - the broken sphere on a pedestal with a pitcher plant and ferns inside. New ideas for my own garden often come when I wander in other gardens, and January is indeed a time for dreaming about gardens.


Once outdoors again, I wandered through all the paths admiring the bones of the garden unhindered by the lush blooms to come. I took note of how the roses are pruned and each plant heaped with rich compost. A gardener tied the long long stems of climbing roses to the arches that will be covered in blooms in a few months. 

Then to the Japanese Garden, one of my favourite spaces. It never used to be so, but I have come to love the constant flow of water throughout the space, the lush mosses, and the sense of tranquility here. The red bridges (there are two or three of them) are striking against all the green. 


In a few more weeks, rhododendrons and azaleas will flower here, adding more colour to this lovely space, but for now, I am content to step along the stones in the quiet colours of January, dreaming of garden days to come. 


27 comments:

  1. How beautiful is this garden. It is hard to imagine it is all done indoors, away from the cold. I like Japanese gardens too, and have been to three or four in Australia. In fact we were thinking of going to one not far from here on Sunday. The red bridges seem to be a constant in these gardens, and they do indeed look very striking. I really like the garden in the broken sphere too. Happy gardening!

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  2. Wonderful photos, Lorrie! Rhododendrons and azaleas blooming in a few more weeks... Our world (here in Eastern Finland) will be covered with snow still at least for three months. Fortunately, the days are already becoming longer.
    I just visited the blog InScribe Writers Online where you are one of the contributing authors. Such a various and rich community. Your "Christmas Memories" is a touching and thought-provoking text.
    Have a happy weekend!

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  3. What a treat to get away from grey Wintry spaces, and enjoy the beauty of those 'inside' gardens.

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  4. I've heard Butchart Gardens is really spectacular but don't think I've ever seen photos. Thanks for sharing these!

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  5. Lucky you to be able to see green things growing this time of year. The only thing we are growing here are snowbanks and icicles. xo Diana

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  6. That really is a treat to get to see flowers in bloom. What a neat place to spend the day. I wish I had been there with you! Hugs, Diane

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  7. It's wonderful to see such colour in the garden at this time of year! Between all the rain and then the snow & ice, my garden isn't faring quite as well so far.

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  8. So much beauty! When I saw that first photo I did wonder how a garden could be so lush and beautiful in January in Canada. HA!

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  9. What a lovely diversion in winter. Interesting to see a pitcher plant in a planter…I’ve only ever seen them in nature.

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  10. It's been a long time since I visited the Japanese Garden in San Francisco, and you make me want to go again. It is always a blessing just as you describe. Just this morning I visited a nursery in hopes of finding a plant for a friend. Under cover, but outdoors, they had hellebores blooming, and azaleas, not blooming yet... but I came away with a little cyclamen with white blooms. It is a wonder and maybe a miracle that I could visit without buying anything for myself, but I think January is the one month that we don't plant seeds, here in my area. So I am focused on other things than the garden, which made it all the more sweet to have a brief visit where the botanical scents were in the air.

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  11. Anonymous4:18 PM

    Just a few more weeks and bulbs will be shooting up, maybe even a few will be blooming, depending if our winter continues to be so mild. I'm sure a visit to Butchart Gardens would provide lots of ideas for the coming season ( plus a feast for the eyes ). GM

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  12. Anonymous7:30 PM

    Lorrie - ..."gardening begins in January with the dream." How true that is. My email inbox has started "sprouting" with seed catalogs and other enticing gardening items. It may be gray and 25 degrees F outside, but the days are getting lighter ... tiptoes toward Spring. Thanks for the lovely photos!

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  13. A gorgeous garden to visit, Lorrie, and so inspiring. Must make your fingers tingle to get started on your own garden. We've been having so much sun this week and such mild temperatures, it feels like spring already. The flowers love it, us not so much, we need the rain.
    Amalia
    xo

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  14. It's a treat to see your beautiful photos at this time of year. Such a nice glimpse of Spring.

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  15. I have always enjoyed Japanese style gardens and we did once considered purchasing a house with a beautiful Japanese reflective pool garden. I did think about having some Japanese elements built into our current garden, but then decided that they were perhaps not suitable for where we live.

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  16. i love Japanese gardens and visited a lot when we went there. Here it is winter! Frost and snow, but little signs of Spring with the daffodils coming out a little.
    I like to visit the garden centres but did not start yet.

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  17. Visiting a garden and dreaming of gardening is good winter fun.

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  18. This post really resonated with me this morning. Without wishing to rush time, I must admit to feeling ready to be out in the garden again. How wonderful to experience the beauty of the Butchart Gardens in all seasons. I like the idea of that "Spring Prelude" and feel encouraged that you were able to experience the scents. Perhaps that means that your sense of smell will soon be back to normal.

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  19. Anonymous8:55 AM

    How I would love walking in this garden with you. It is so beautiful any time of the year. I love that sphere too. What a fun idea!

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  20. Butchart Gardens always looks so lovely ...
    A wonderful place to visit.
    I have enjoyed your photographs.

    All the best Jan

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  21. So lovely in every season!

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  22. Thank you for taking us along to Butchart Gardens with you!

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  23. It must be such a wonderful treat to spend the day in such a beautiful garden.
    Fabulous photos, Lorrie.

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  24. Very lovely photos to see in winter. Lorrie! Our botanic garden conservatory always has an orchid display this time of year that we venture into Denver to see, but this year we have been avoiding crowds as we have an upcoming trip and are trying to stay healthy for it.

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  25. What a lovely post. Gorgeous orchids. B x

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  26. Those are lovely gardens! I was there in 1979!

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  27. The picture of the broken sphere with the plant inside, caught my eye. All the pictures are attractive , but this one , for some reason, looked special to me.

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