Monday, October 17, 2022

October Daily 17:

 


Several years ago we planted grapes. They've flourished, but we realized that we don't eat them because they have seeds. Grape jelly isn't very popular, and we don't want to get started with winemaking. So what do we do with 27 pounds of grapes? 


I spent a good portion of the day making grape juice. Although we don't often drink juice, this is unsweetened and very refreshing on a hot day. It's also good to serve to guests who don't want anything alcoholic. But it was a LOT of work. Stripping the grapes, squishing the grapes, simmering the grapes, straining the grapes, then straining the grape juice, before finally bottling it all up and processing it in a hot water bath. 

I'm ready to pull out these vines. But do we want to plant some seedless grapes that we will eat, or do we want something else? Decisions, decisions.  


On the other hand, strawberries are extremely popular with everyone, particularly the younger set who love heading out into Nana's garden to pull the berries and pop them into their little mouths. I picked a small bowlful for the two of us yesterday - sun sweetened morsels made all the more precious for their scarcity. 


16 comments:

  1. Such a beautiful photo of the grapes. A friend of mine who is very health conscious, orders her raisins from India because they have seeds. She cannot talk enough about the benefits of grape seeds. But they are not that pleasant to eat.
    Amalia
    xo

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  2. Wow amazed that your strawberries are still fruiting. Ours gave up a good few months ago. Gosh that grape juice does sound like hard work. Must admit we do prefer seedless grapes. If you’ve got the weather to grow then maybe it’s worth changing vines. B x

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  3. Count it a great day when your toughest decision is about the garden!

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  4. I always loved having strawberries in the garden! And the grapes have done well so maybe a seedless variety would be the answer! Enjoy your day!

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  5. That was a lot of work! It will be interesting to see what you decide to plant there.

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  6. Dear Lorrie
    Please order an "Interlaken Grape" . It is a golden grape, seedless and has very fine skin. It is also very sweet and ripens early. They are a perfect eating grape and also make excellent juice. On top of that they are also hardy to zone 4.

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  7. Lots of work there!
    Grapes to a local food shelf, sell to restaurant or farmer's market seller are options.
    I remember step grandmother in her backyard making grape juice. The aroma was devine.The work is not easy.

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  8. The grapes look so beautiful... I would definitely keep the plants for photographic purposes. :) I also googled "What wild animals will eat grapes?". Black bear was first on the list. I wonder if you could pick the fruit and donate it to animal charities.
    Still strawberries. How wonderful is that!

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  9. Once a very long time ago we were offered free wine grapes for the picking. I well remember the laborious process to get the juice, of which I froze several quarts, as I recall. We drank the remainder like wine, it was so delicious.

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  10. Hi Lorrie~ Your grapes are beautiful! Have you considered getting a steamer for making grape juice? A friend of mine has grapes and she uses it every year for her grape juice. I understand it's very easy to use and way less labor intensive, something to check into. You are so blessed to still have strawberries! Have a great week! Hugs, Barb

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  11. Keep the present ones, for the birds.

    Plant seedless, for you.

    Maybe?

    🎃 🎃 🎃 🎃 🎃 🎃

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  12. The grape juice sure does sound like a lot of work. I can understand your inclination to pull the vines out. The interlaken variety that Gina mentions in her comment sound like a good kind to try.

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  13. That's more work than my lazy self would accomplish. My kids would consider freeze drying the grapes.

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  14. Your grapes look beautiful, but alas, the work in making grape juice is daunting. The seedless alternative sounds like a great idea. As for strawberries, how beautiful to have them growing in your own garden. I am sure the grandies love that!

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  15. Anonymous6:02 AM

    I always buy seedless grapes It is nice to eat

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  16. I confess to preferring the fermented kind of grape juice. It goes well with dinner!

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